The development and transmission of bacterial antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a complex and multifaceted process. One of the main drivers identified for the development and spread of AMR is the use of antimicrobials in human and veterinary medicine as well as for agricultural use.

If climate patterns continue to shift in the future, it is likely that most of New Zealand’s primary industry sectors – meat and wool, dairy, arable, horticulture, viticulture, aquaculture and forestry, will experience changes in productivity and relative profitability.

Biocides are an integral component in maintaining Good Hygienic Practice (GHP) in the dairy and other food and beverage industries.

FoodSafe is a MBIE funded, University of Auckland led, research programme aimed at developing near real time devices to assess food safety in situ

Bacillus cereus is a pathogenic spore-forming bacterium that occurs naturally in a wide variety of foods. B. cereus spores remain a challenge to the food industry due to their resistance to heating and dehydration, and their ability to germinate and grow in foods held at low temperatures (Soni et al., 2016) .